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"My IBS has a great sense of timing. It always chooses the most inconvenient moments to make an appearance!"

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First off allow me inform you that that is a site for natural I.B.S treatment's to help the signs and symptoms and is in no way to update your prescribed remedy from a qualified medical doctor ..Please if you suppose you are suffering from irritable bowl syndrome get a expert diagnosis and never self diagnose .

IBS Advice is here to help you fight your IBS symptoms and take back control of your life. With our advice and alternative solutions, you can find the relief you’ve been looking for.
Get Relief from Your Symptoms
FIND A range of advice and alternative solutions to help reduce and even eliminate IBS symptoms. From diet and lifestyle tips to herbal remedies, we can help you get back on track.
A Holistic Approach
Our approach looks at all aspects of managing IBS symptoms, including diet, lifestyle, mental health, and more. We believe in treating the body as a whole system to get the best results.

IBS FACTS

IBS affects approximately 10-15% of the global population.

The prevalence of IBS can vary among different countries and regions. While there isn't comprehensive data available for every country, studies have reported higher rates of IBS in Western countries compared to other regions. However, more research is needed to establish precise prevalence rates by country.

IBS tends to affect women more frequently than men. Studies suggest that the prevalence of IBS is higher among females, with a female-to-male ratio of approximately 2:1. However, it is important to note that IBS affects both genders.

IBS can occur at any age, but it often develops in early adulthood. The condition can affect individuals across the lifespan, from children to older adults. Studies indicate that the highest prevalence of IBS occurs in individuals under the age of 50, with a peak in the 20-39 age range. However, IBS can persist or develop in older individuals as well.

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What is I.B.S ?

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a commonplace and regularly debilitating situation that affects the gastrointestinal machine. It is characterised with the aid of belly ache, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. IBS can purpose a excellent deal of pain and might extensively impact nice of life. Fortunately, there are treatments to be had to assist control IBS symptoms. Natural remedies such as nutritional modifications, way of life changes, and natural dietary supplements have been recognized to provide remedy for many people laid low with IBS. Additionally, there are various medicinal drugs that could assist to control the signs of IBS. With the proper aggregate of treatments and life-style modifications, people with IBS can locate considerable relief from their signs and symptoms.

While there's no single remedy for IBS, natural treatments can provide alleviation and help manipulate symptoms. Herbs have been used historically to deal with IBS symptoms. Other herbal treatments encompass probiotics, nutritional modifications, and stress-reduction techniques. This website will explore the numerous natural cures for IBS and how they are able to assist humans laid low with this circumstance






Different types of IBS

BS with constipation (IBS-C)
Is the most common type of IBS. It is characterized by hard, lumpy stools that are difficult to pass. People with IBS-C may also experience abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.
IBS-C is the most common type of IBS, affecting about 75% of people with IBS.
It is characterized by the following symptoms:

Hard, lumpy stools: Stools that are difficult to pass and are larger than normal.
Incomplete emptying of the bowel: A feeling that the bowel does not empty completely after a bowel movement.
Straining to have a bowel movement: Having to push hard to have a bowel movement.
Fewer than three bowel movements per week: Having fewer than three bowel movements per week.
Abdominal pain or discomfort that is relieved by a bowel movement: Pain or discomfort in the abdomen that is relieved by having a bowel movement.
Bloating or gas: A feeling of fullness or tightness in the abdomen, or the presence of gas in the digestive tract.

IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D)
is characterized by loose, watery stools that are more frequent than normal. People with IBS-D may also experience abdominal pain, bloating, and gas. It is characterized by the following symptoms:

Bloating: This is a feeling of fullness or tightness in the abdomen.
Gas: This is a buildup of gas in the digestive tract.
Nausea: This is a feeling of sickness in the stomach.
Vomiting: This is the forceful expulsion of stomach contents through the mouth.
Weight loss: This can occur if IBS-D is severe and causes people to eat less.
Menstrual irregularities: Some women with IBS-D may experience changes in their menstrual cycle, such as heavier bleeding or more frequent periods.
Unexplained fatigue: This is a feeling of tiredness or weakness that does not go away with rest.
Anxiety: This is a feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease.
Depression: This is a mood disorder that can cause feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and worthlessness.

IBS with mixed bowel habits (IBS-M)
is characterized by alternating episodes of constipation and diarrhea. People with IBS-M may also experience abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.

"My IBS is like a game show host. It loves surprising me with unexpected episodes!"

What else could it be ?

Other conditions that can cause stomach pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation:

Celiac disease:
Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine when gluten is ingested. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Symptoms of celiac disease can include stomach pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD):
IBD is a chronic condition that causes inflammation of the digestive tract. The two main types of IBD are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO):
Is a condition in which there is an excessive amount of bacteria in the small intestine. This can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, gas, and weight loss. SIBO can be caused by a number of factors, including surgery, infections, and certain medications.

Bile acid malabsorption (BAM):
Is a condition in which the body is unable to absorb bile acids properly. Bile acids are produced by the liver and help to digest fats. When bile acids are not absorbed properly, they can cause diarrhea, bloating, and gas. BAM can be caused by a number of factors, including surgery, infections, and certain medications.

Lactose intolerance:
Lactose intolerance is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the enzyme lactase, which is needed to digest lactose. Lactose is a sugar found in milk and dairy products. Symptoms of lactose intolerance can include stomach pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, and gas.

Gallstones:
Gallstones are hard deposits that form in the gallbladder. The gallbladder is a small organ that sits below the liver. Gallstones can cause pain in the upper right abdomen, nausea, vomiting, and indigestion.

Diverticulitis:
Diverticulitis is an inflammation of diverticula, small pouches that can form in the lining of the colon. Symptoms of diverticulitis can include abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, fever, and constipation.





How is
IBS Diagnosed?

The diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is typically made based on the presence of characteristic symptoms and the exclusion of other potential causes. The diagnostic process for IBS involves the following steps:

Medical History:
Your doctor will begin by taking a detailed medical history, including a discussion of your symptoms. They will ask about the nature, frequency, and duration of your abdominal pain or discomfort, as well as any changes in bowel habits (such as diarrhea, constipation, or both).

Rome Criteria:
IBS is diagnosed based on the Rome criteria, which are a set of standardized guidelines for diagnosing functional gastrointestinal disorders. According to the current Rome IV criteria, a diagnosis of IBS requires the presence of recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort for at least six months, along with evidence of disturbed bowel habits. These symptoms should be present on at least three days per month in the last three months and should have started at least six months before the diagnosis.

Symptom Evaluation:
Your doctor will evaluate your symptoms to determine if they align with the characteristic features of IBS. These may include abdominal pain or discomfort that is relieved by defecation, changes in stool frequency or consistency, and the presence of bloating or a feeling of incomplete bowel evacuation.

Physical Examination:
A physical examination may be conducted to assess for any signs or abnormalities that could suggest an underlying condition. However, IBS does not typically present with specific physical findings, so the examination is often normal.

Exclusion of other conditions:
To confirm the diagnosis of IBS, your doctor may order additional tests to exclude other potential causes of your symptoms. These tests may include blood tests, stool tests to check for signs of inflammation or infection, and possibly imaging studies or endoscopy if there are additional concerns.

It's important to note that there is no specific test or biomarker for diagnosing IBS. The diagnosis is primarily based on the presence of characteristic symptoms and the absence of other identifiable gastrointestinal conditions. If you're experiencing persistent or concerning symptoms, it's recommended to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

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IBS Treatments

There is no cure for IBS, but there are treatments that can help relieve symptoms. The most effective treatment for IBS is a combination of lifestyle changes and medications.

Lifestyle changes

Lifestyle changes that can help improve IBS symptoms include:

Eating a healthy diet that is high in fiber and low in processed foods. Fiber helps keep your digestive system healthy and can help to reduce constipation. Good sources of fiber include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
Avoiding foods that trigger your symptoms. Common IBS triggers include caffeine, alcohol, fatty foods, and spicy foods. Keep a food journal to track what you eat and when you have symptoms to help you identify your triggers.
Getting regular exercise. Exercise helps to improve digestion and reduce stress, both of which can worsen IBS symptoms. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week.
Managing stress. Stress can worsen IBS symptoms. Find healthy ways to manage stress, such as yoga, meditation, or spending time in nature.
Getting enough sleep. When you're well-rested, your body is better able to cope with stress and other triggers that can worsen IBS symptoms. Aim for 7-8 hours of sleep each night.
Medications

Medications that can be used to treat IBS include:

Antispasmodics:
These medications help to relax the muscles in the intestines and relieve cramping.
Laxatives:
These medications help to soften the stool and make it easier to pass.
Diarrhea medications:
These medications slow down the movement of food through the intestines and help to reduce diarrhea.
Probiotics:
Probiotics are live bacteria that are similar to the "good" bacteria that naturally live in the intestines. Probiotics may help to improve IBS symptoms by restoring the balance of bacteria in the gut.

If lifestyle changes and medications do not relieve your IBS symptoms, you may want to consider other treatments, such as:

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT):
CBT is a type of therapy that can help you to change the way you think about and react to your IBS symptoms.
Hypnotherapy:
Hypnotherapy is a type of therapy that uses hypnosis to help you relax and control your symptoms.
Acupuncture:
Acupuncture is a type of traditional Chinese medicine that involves inserting thin needles into the skin at specific points on the body. Acupuncture may help to relieve IBS symptoms by reducing pain and inflammation.

Modern treatment's for IBS

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT):

Is a procedure in which stool from a healthy donor is transplanted into the colon of a person with a disease that is caused by an imbalance of gut bacteria. FMT is still in the early stages of research, but it has shown some promise in treating a variety of conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
The exact mechanism by which FMT works is not fully understood, but it is thought that the transplanted bacteria help to restore the balance of gut bacteria in the recipient. This can help to improve symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and bloating.
FMT is typically performed as an outpatient procedure. The donor stool is processed and then given to the recipient through a colonoscopy, enema, or capsule. The procedure is generally well-tolerated, but there are some risks associated with FMT, such as infection.
FMT is not yet a standard treatment for IBS, but it is being studied in clinical trials. If you are interested in learning more about FMT, talk to your doctor.
Here are some additional details about FMT:
Who is a good candidate for FMT? FMT may be a good option for people with IBS who have not responded to other treatments. It is important to talk to your doctor to see if FMT is right for you.
What are the risks of FMT? The most common risk of FMT is infection. Other risks include:
Colitis (inflammation of the colon)
Sepsis (a life-threatening infection)
Transmission of diseases, such as HIV and hepatitis
What are the side effects of FMT? The most common side effects of FMT are:
Diarrhea
Abdominal pain
Bloating
Gas
Nausea
Vomiting
How much does FMT cost? The cost of FMT varies depending on the location and the type of procedure. In the United States, FMT can cost anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000.
If you are considering FMT, it is important to talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of the procedure.


Neuromodulation:

Is a type of therapy that uses electrical stimulation to modify nerve activity in the body. It has been used to treat a variety of conditions, including chronic pain, urinary incontinence, and epilepsy. Neuromodulation is still in the early stages of research, but it has shown some promise in treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
IBS is a chronic condition that affects the large intestine. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, changes in bowel habits, and bloating or gas. The exact cause of IBS is unknown, but it is thought to be caused by a combination of factors, including genetics, diet, stress, and hormones.
Neuromodulation for IBS works by stimulating the nerves that control the gut. This can help to improve symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and bloating. Neuromodulation can be delivered in a number of ways, including:
Sacral nerve stimulation: This is a type of neuromodulation that uses an electrical implant to stimulate the nerves in the sacral region of the spine.
Vagus nerve stimulation: This is a type of neuromodulation that uses an electrical implant to stimulate the vagus nerve, which runs from the brain to the stomach.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS): This is a type of neuromodulation that uses electrodes placed on the skin to deliver electrical stimulation.
Neuromodulation is generally well-tolerated, but there are some risks associated with the procedure, such as infection and bleeding. Neuromodulation is not a cure for IBS, but it can help to improve symptoms and improve quality of life. If you are interested in learning more about neuromodulation for IBS, talk to your doctor.

Cannabinoids: 

Are a group of chemical compounds that are found in the cannabis plant. Cannabinoids have a wide range of effects on the body, including pain relief, nausea relief, and appetite stimulation. Cannabinoids have also been shown to be effective in treating a variety of medical conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
IBS is a chronic condition that affects the large intestine. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, changes in bowel habits, and bloating or gas. The exact cause of IBS is unknown, but it is thought to be caused by a combination of factors, including genetics, diet, stress, and hormones.
Cannabinoids may be effective in treating IBS by:
Relieving pain and cramping
Reducing inflammation
Slowing down the movement of food through the digestive tract
Reducing anxiety and stress
Cannabinoids can be administered in a variety of ways, including:

Oral capsules
Sublingual drops
Topical creams
Vaporizers
Edibles
It is important to talk to your doctor before using cannabinoids to treat IBS, as there are some potential side effects, such as:

Dizziness
Drowsiness
Dry mouth
Red eyes
Nausea
Vomiting
If you are considering using cannabinoids to treat IBS, it is important to start with a low dose and increase the dose gradually as needed. It is also important to talk to your doctor about any other medications you are taking, as cannabinoids can interact with other medications

"IBS is like having a diva for a digestive system. It demands attention and can throw a tantrum at any moment."

IBS Tips

There are many things that can be done to help manage the symptoms of IBS, from dietary changes to lifestyle modifications. Here are 10 tips on what works for IBS management:
Get rid of processed foods:
Processed foods are high in sodium, sugar, and artificial ingredients, all of which can exacerbate your IBS symptoms. To maintain better gut health try to avoid processed foods as much as you possibly can. Try to Choose whole, unprocessed foods like fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains instead.

Incorporate more fiber into your diet:
Try Increasing your dietary fiber intake is an effective way to help control IBS symptoms. Fibrous foods can help to relieve your constipation, and reduce bloating and gas, and stabilize your digestion. Aim to get 25–35 g of fiber per day—good sources include beans, berries, nuts, and seeds.

Limit your dairy intake:
Dairy can be a common trigger food for IBS, leading to uncomfortable symptoms like bloating, abdominal cramps, and flatulence. If dairy triggers your IBS symptoms, limit your intake of it or cut it out of your diet entirely.

Trying a low FODMAP diet:
For those struggling with IBS, a low FODMAP diet can be most effective in reducing your symptoms. This diet eliminates some types of carbs found in dairy and fruit, which many people with IBS have problems digesting. Have a chat with your doctor to see if this diet is right choice for you.

Eat smaller, more frequent meals:
Eating smaller, more frequent meals throughout the day can be beneficial for IBS sufferers. This can help to stimulate food digestion and help to regulate bowel movements. Aim to eat 5–6 smaller meals throughout the day, rather than 3 large meals.

Avoid trigger foods:
Everyone is different and has their own unique food triggers. To identify your triggers, keep a food diary, which tracks what you eat and any unpleasant symptoms that follow. Once you have identified your triggers, avoid them at all costs. Food triggers can vary from person to person, but some of the most common ones are caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods.

Avoid eating late at night:
Many experts recommend avoiding eating late at night. Eating late at night can lead to acid reflux, heartburn, and digestive discomfort. If the symptom is already present on an empty stomach, try not eating close to bedtime or consuming high-fat foods late at night.

Chew your food slowly and thoroughly:
Eating too fast can cause indigestion and lead to uncomfortable symptoms. Slow down and make sure you are chewing your food thoroughly, as this will reduce the amount of air you swallow as well as help you digest food more easily.

Manage your stress:
Stress can exacerbate IBS symptoms, so it is important to manage your stress levels. Take some time to relax and unwind each day, such as going for a walk or listening to music. Stress-reduction techniques like yoga, meditation, and deep breathing can also3. Limit your dairy intake.

Get regular exercise:
Exercise has been found to be one of the most effective treatments for IBS. Getting regular physical activity will help to improve your digestion and reduce stress, both of which can help to ease IBS symptoms. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise each day.

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IBS Support


The IBS Network:
Is a UK-based charity that provides information and support to people with IBS. They have a website with information about IBS, as well as a forum where people can connect with others who are struggling with IBS.

Guts UK:
Is a UK-based charity that provides information and support to people with digestive conditions. They have a page on their website about IBS, which includes information about symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.


International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD):
This website provides a comprehensive evaluate of IBS and its treatment options, such as CBT. They have a section specially devoted to CBT for IBS, which incorporates a list of therapists who specialize on this kind of therapy.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):
This internet site gives an in depth manual to managing IBS, which incorporates statistics on CBT as a remedy choice.

The British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG):
The BSG offers a guideline on the control of IBS in adults, which incorporates suggestions for the use of psychological treatment options, along with CBT.

American College of Gastroenterology (ACG):
The ACG offers a affected person education brochure on IBS, which includes information on CBT as a remedy choice.

Psychology Today:
This internet site permits you to look for therapists who specialise in CBT for IBS in your area.

The Rome Foundation:
The Rome Foundation is a nonprofit employer committed to improving the prognosis and treatment of purposeful gastrointestinal disorders, along with IBS. They provide resources and information on CBT for IBS.

It's important to be aware that locating a qualified therapist who specializes in CBT for IBS is vital for a hit treatment. Your primary care medical doctor or gastroenterologist may be able to refer you to a therapist in your location 

"IBS is like playing a game of Russian roulette every time I eat. Will it be a peaceful digestion or an explosive situation?"

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What is the difference between IBS and SIBO?

In this video, Dr. Turbide talks about the difference between IBS and SIBO.

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